1. Join the Camping Babble forums today and become an active member of our growing community. Once registered you'll be able to exchange camping photos, stories and experience with other members. If you're still undecided, feel free to take a look around and see what we're all about!

Back to Bannock...

Discussion in 'Food' started by Northern Dancer, Nov 19, 2015.

  1. Northern Dancer

    Northern Dancer Survivalist


    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQC3PpTuyMZz834chkeugyWrSh-ArX9RM6buXvZly8enHDlm2bVVw.jpg Bannock with raisins


    Flat breads where the original breads.
    They are sill a major source of nourishment in many countries throughout the world. They, generally, are cooked very quickly (as little as 2 minutes) over a very hot surface. They can cooked on a pan, griddle, hot pebbles. A lot of flat breads do not require any leavening agent. The puffing effect is due to the rapid vaporization of the water contained in the dough. Since flat breads do not require strong gluten , they can be made by a great variety of grains. Its a very interesting source of bread recipe for coeliacs as gluten free flours can be used to make most type of flat breads.


    Here are a few unleavened breads from around the world.
    • Matzoh: Comes from Israel. It's a very thin bread with a cracker-like texture.
    • Lavash: Traditional bread from Armenia. It's paper thin and often dried. Then, it has to be re-hydrated before use.
    • Lefse: Norwegian flat bread made of potato and flour, often butter and cream are added to the dough.
    • Bannocks: Scottish flat bread made of oatmeal. It has a texture in between a muffin and cracker.
    • Barley Bread: Traditional bread from Tibet made from roasted barley flour: the Tsampa. Shaobing:
    • Baobing: Is a traditional Chinese flat bread often used as a wrapper. They consist of hot water dough which are rolled into very thin pancakes.
    • Tortilla: Traditional Mexican flat bread made of maize or wheat flour and cooked on a griddle the comal . It is mainly used as a wrap.
    • Injera: Traditional, staple Ethiopian bread made with teff flour. It is similar to a pancake or a crumpet. It is used as a wrapper.
    • Potato farl: Traditional Irish flat bread, also known as fadge which is made with some mashed potato with some flour and enriched with some milk. It is serve for breakfast.
    • Soda crackers: Traditional American thin, crispy flat bread made of wheat flour dried in the oven
    AND THEN THERE IS NORTH AMERICAN BANNOCK or what we assume was a type of bread introduced by the Scots to the fur traders.

    Here are a few of the recipes that I use. Keep in mind that the fewer the ingredients used are closest to the original. But...then again...you know how we do things. (One listed is also the one that @ 2Sweed uses for Bannock on a Stick).

    BANNOCK BREAD RECIPES (Mix dry ingredient and place in baggie when tripping)

    :hungry: FRYING – Two recipes (+ indicates bigger serving)
    +2 or 1 Cups of flour
    +1 or ½ Table spoon of baking Powder, sugar & salt
    *Can add raisins or dried cranberries
    ½ Cup of water or a bit +1 More.

    Mix until a paste like substance
    ½ Cup of cooking oil in a cast iron fry pan
    1 Table spoon of mixture into medium heat - cook until you see a shimmer, Fry until gold brown
    Remove and place on paper towel to rid excess oil

    :hungry: A BIT MORE LUXURIOUS in a fry pan – Two recipes (+)
    +2 Cups of flour or
    1 Cup of flour
    +1 Tablespoon baking powder or
    ½ Tablespoon baking powder
    +½ Teaspoon of salt or
    ¼ Teaspoon of salt
    +½ Cup milk or
    ¼ Cup of milk
    +½ Cup water or
    ¼ Cup of water

    :hungry: DOWN TO THE GROUND CANOE GUY RECIPE (This is one serving)
    1 Cup of four
    ½ Tablespoon baking powder (can add ½ Tablespoon of sugar)
    ¼ Teaspoon of salt
    ½ Cup of water


    upload_2015-11-19_16-32-34.jpeg On a SICK.... images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS4wRD6K20hRnnykcxr0xd623THjoxk_Q8DCP0NLFSM4bc38kkY.jpg or Skillet :)


     
Draft saved Draft deleted
Loading...
Similar Threads - Bannock
  1. 2sweed
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    973

Share This Page