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DEATH OF A TENT...

Discussion in 'Shelter' started by Northern Dancer, Nov 12, 2015.

  1. Northern Dancer

    Northern Dancer Survivalist

    It's the annual Equipment Inventory
    I do it every year just about this time when I'm absolutely sure that the summer is over. :(
    It's a time to throw out items not used and food stuffs left behind that are past the best to eat date. There are well used t-towels, clothing, utensils and such that need to be cleared away and other items beyond their prime.

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSdF-AxMTOREkufEICnJ3Rif9YkOEgD37SIUVrNuJkijLUjyQfEZg.jpg 12 X 12 Outback Tent

    While I was doing this (note - it takes about a week to accomplish the task) I was reminded of the death of one of my tents two years ago. Yep...it was tragic. I loaned (never again will I do that) a $750.00 outfitters tent to an experienced camper no less. He did the unmentionable - at the end of his trip he packed the tent wet. He packed the tent wet and put it in the trunk of his van and left it there for two weeks. In spite of my calls to return the item he left it in the trunk of his van for two whole weeks. :arghh:

    I wasn't home at the time he returned it; he just left it there on the veranda - dead.

    I didn't know that until I unravelled it and set it up. As I unrolled it it was wet of course and I could smell the mildew and I knew that further examination was only going to confirm my suspicion. :mad: When I put up the waterproof layer in side dangled in shreds and the ordour was repugnant.

    Some will come to my aid and announce some formula or treatment that I could have used - but alas it was to late and the tent could no longer be used for any outdoor adventure. It's dry now - but ugly inside. I haven't had the nerve to throw it out.

    All he had to do was to deliver it to me on the way home and I would have managed it all. :(

    So...for tents.

    NEVER
    store them wet.
    Do not store them on a concrete floor.
    Make sure the are absolutely dry.
    Hang them if you can.
    Store them in a cool dry cool place.
    Make sure that they are totally clean and that spots are gently removed.
    Tag them with pertinent information - has pegs, mallet, etc. etc.


    upload_2015-11-12_22-46-42.jpeg

    REMEMBER...
    If you take care of your equipment...
    your equipment will take care of you!


     
    Joseph Hadnett likes this.
  2. CherylTorrie

    CherylTorrie Novice Camper

    I'm like you I couldn't throw it out either. Is it possible that you can camouflage the damage? I have used fabric paint and watered down latex with some success. Cover your floor with tons of old newspapers, lie the tent out with the stained area exposed and then have at it. You don't have to be an artist but you could even get creative with it after you paint a base color, then don't forget to use a clear water repellant spray as a sealer. I know your angry with the person who borrowed and damaged it but don't take it out on the innocent tent. :) Make it pretty again.
     
  3. Northern Dancer

    Northern Dancer Survivalist

    @ CherylTorrie - it's dead, like this was first time I saw what eating bacteria could do to fabric. Though, when I read your note I thought I could use it for a sun shelter. :( To pick up where you are - I use a foot (tent fly) for ground cover and I use rugs of various kinds including a cow hide for my tee-pee to protect the floors for my healthy tents.
     
    CherylTorrie likes this.
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