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"Wanna" see YOUR magnificent trails...

Discussion in 'Trails' started by Northern Dancer, Nov 10, 2014.

  1. campforums

    campforums Founder Staff Member

    I don't know much about the story other than the recipe is TOP SECRET, I also visited the very first KFC when I was passing through Kentucky one time.
     
  2. Northern Dancer

    Northern Dancer Survivalist

    He is really an outstanding man.

    According to his 1974 autobiography, before Harland Sanders became a world-famous Colonel, he was a sixth-grade dropout, a farmhand, an army mule-tender, a locomotive fireman, a railroad worker, an aspiring lawyer, an insurance salesman, a ferryboat entrepreneur, a tire salesman, an amateur obstetrician, an (unsuccessful) political candidate, a gas station operator, a motel operator and finally, a restaurateur. At the age of 65, a new interstate highway snatched the traffic away from his Corbin, Ky., restaurant and Sanders was left with nothing but a Social Security check and a secret recipe for fried chicken.


    As it turned out, that was all he needed.

    Until he was fatally stricken with leukemia in 1980 at the age of 90, the Colonel travelled 250,000 miles a year visiting KFC restaurants around the world. His likeness continues to appear on millions of buckets and on thousands of restaurants in more than 100 countries around the world.

    He lived in Mississauga for a number of years.
     
  3. 2sweed

    2sweed Natural Camper Staff Member

    Thought I would share this map of one of @Dancers, favorite places. This kind of shows us all the ins and outs of the Algonquin Provincial Park.

    file.jpg
     
    campforums likes this.
  4. Northern Dancer

    Northern Dancer Survivalist

    Now that is a map I haven't seen - interesting.
     
  5. Northern Dancer

    Northern Dancer Survivalist

    Behold! An empire of mountains and ice. Here in a vast international preserve, are most of the tallest peaks in North America and the largest ice fields outside the polar caps. Over half the land mass is permanently draped in snow and ice – the remainder fosters forests and tundra and stable populations of eagles, grizzlies and other species often at risk elsewhere.

    Kluane National Park and Reserve of Canada

    spot2_e.ashx?w=183&as=1.jpg NatCul%20LGorecki%202342.ashx?w=553&h=188&as=1.jpg

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSI1CMm-1EJlQufrbSvuQ67KA16aLCrnGxYMB8FKFihlIyykf9e.jpg upload_2015-2-19_10-11-9.jpeg

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQXKnqxK1X_OGieRaVUzEG3sY2SS5AuvKsmk24CycjuLj8k3NCS.jpg images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRsfILlwor5BMlgBzPlB302LDeIl6oLE1m6e23cyv-JxRUDiwe-.jpg images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTSVo-q3sdaFOXW7IZ137fToj-WFkrhvCElgePFc3DMFb2J_Qs.jpg images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT0iOPDqMqTO0NXmIOraSlGknBI6cI_2QTA6PXLJeHsS1FrxsYXIg.jpg images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSknwNRdykwZQLLNYy8F38dV0LkO62dt1P7_ZP6MQw7Sv74d4pTng.jpg images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSF5fUOsrldDkQgbqdz1yUE-arsaTH36qbN37BbBfotOp0NySkcPQ.jpg Love it!
     
    happyflowerlady likes this.
  6. actadh

    actadh Explorer

    I am partial to Hocking Hills in Ohio - it was the first place my husband and I hiked together. Now we like it because so much of it is handicap accessible.
    member_16.jpg

    http://www.hockinghills.com/hiking.html
     
    Northern Dancer likes this.
  7. Northern Dancer

    Northern Dancer Survivalist

    Fantastic - and thank you so much for contributing an article to this space @actadh. We are so lucky [okay...blessed] with an abundance of park lands and wilderness spaces on both sides of the boarder. It is amazing to think that much of Hocking Hills is handicapped accessible.

    We owe a great dept to people who sat on committees for what must seemed like for ever to come up with marvellous ideas and suggestions to make things better for the whole community.

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRjTeG5NJIhDYnaS4Q9aWI00jJ79yHFc59noHssddxW1Wz5j_Kt.jpg
     
    campforums likes this.
  8. campforums

    campforums Founder Staff Member

    Interesting, it sounds like he lived quite the life. I think you have just convinced me to add a book on him to my "To read" list.
     
  9. Northern Dancer

    Northern Dancer Survivalist

    I've lived long enough to know there is greatness all around. I use to say to students, "All around us, everywhere, there are heroes, people that we can reach out and touch." "You may be one of them."
     
    campforums likes this.
  10. campforums

    campforums Founder Staff Member

    I wonder if that means @2sweed is considering a visit ;)
     
  11. Northern Dancer

    Northern Dancer Survivalist

    Trek Newfoundland’s Long Range Traverse
    Newfoundland, the Last Province to Join Confederation [1949] and Home of the Labrador Retriever


    Locals simply call this Montana-size island of serrated granite 20 miles off the coast of Quebec “The Rock.” And with more than 10,000 miles of craggy coastline and only 12 people per square mile, The Rock, Canada’s easternmost point, is a backpacker’s dream. The best route is the five-day Long Range Traverse in 446,080-acre Gros Morne National Park, where you’ll encounter edge-of-the-world views of coastal fjords (inlets) sparkling between 1,000-foot granite cliffs at every bend.


    After a mandatory park orientation, drive 12 miles to the trail head at Western Brook Pond. Load up and walk the easy two-mile trail to the shore of a freshwater fjord (inlet). From here, take an hour-long ferry to the start of the Long Range Traverse, which begins with a 2,000-foot climb that switchbacks straight up from the boat dock. Once above treeline, where harsh, icy winds have scoured the glacier-carved landscape, you’ll feel like you’re walking on the moon.

    * Description by Backpacker Magazine

    upload_2015-2-24_23-18-40.jpeg upload_2015-2-24_23-18-59.jpeg images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSBT8H4okuAE-g219aV6xG9e3VdeTjbPPcI3ffk6FH_C4JNm1T_aQ.jpg images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSPWDzxqTVxAp0z3yAlaHig-qw54HENpWfw0AetHIGF5dPTHyDT5A.jpg images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSrpM3jQHk_Xk3VgE_0OfZaLvMPrYz7Z7M3kmortNcPXACvNvlm.jpg images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSVxryiZx2ihsr4P-WNf06BSj3c5kRc1BCnoHLbvDOoRf802q2Q.jpg
     
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  12. campforums

    campforums Founder Staff Member

    That is a great shot of the moose, I always wonder how the get the to "pose" or turn around and look at the camera without startling them off.

    How long is that 5 day long route?
     
  13. Northern Dancer

    Northern Dancer Survivalist

    :)

    Surprisingly enough, moose are very co-operative when it comes to having their picture taken. A zoom lenses of some sort helps. Most frequently they are eating or drinking which slows them down some. They exhibit a horse like whinny if you are getting to close. Often they just trot away from you - and stop to look back to see if you are following.
     
  14. 2sweed

    2sweed Natural Camper Staff Member

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTvw6XEbCfpfwrj5ycevVi61d_f-wu0cHBCGIpfZz3XpVXg4sv5PA.jpg Finding all this quite amoosing!!
     
    Northern Dancer likes this.
  15. Northern Dancer

    Northern Dancer Survivalist

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTYefJETqzm2kdj2feahDqIYhTkxS8v0qiaQPfgdJj4C2mPIvon.jpg It's all water to me...
     
  16. Onatah

    Onatah Novice Camper

    A few photos of where we camp/trail ride, some of which is our own property.


    woodedpark.jpg 10599369_10153205541712178_2199391454372325026_n.jpg 10700735_10204813134273137_709092494788558481_o.jpg 12080175_10154322352572178_7971304076220679082_o.jpg blueracer.jpg unnamed (3).jpg unnamed (30).jpg
     
    Northern Dancer likes this.
  17. Northern Dancer

    Northern Dancer Survivalist

  18. Northern Dancer

    Northern Dancer Survivalist

    HI ALL!

    I bet there are some mighty fine trails right in the community where you live. Luv to see em.

    This is what the City of Hamilton did with the old "THB" [Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo railroad line 1894 to 1987]. It is a beautiful trail that meanders 9.5 km through the City.

    upload_2016-2-26_13-27-34.jpeg upload_2016-2-26_13-27-53.jpeg images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT2Oak2lf6lo2mp_GTlPKe58B8DxDZEzARSTrQUnpimVboiVRul.jpg images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQUlkUX4W6cOIKx2wIgcAHGUZCH9be-btGlc5h5Y-KLEwj3gNUIsA.jpg images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSkliq4gsdBDWk9tq1D6mDQHvdcBcTSC3w33U_Z0V6xtjrEmCVyFA.jpg images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSFKooH0WdPY2qGSQnIXF4gMyVEWaFPO6rRvrZsnM3Y6ch3nVdQ.jpg images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTeukSxci8mcRrtAESx9QkQu7UrX9-S2O9YviyFDbYigrZWzd_AsA.jpg HamiltonOntarioSkylineC.jpg
    City of Hamilton from the brow

    Go ahead...boast about your community.
     
  19. @Northern Dancer post about Long Range Traverse, piqued my interest. Starting with no knowledge beyond that shared by @Northern Dancer, I did some research and ended up writing an article about how to do your research when planning a trip to experience an unknown trail. The blog post shares what I uncovered about the Long Range Traverse, how to get topographic maps of Canada for free and more.

    Check it out at at the Explore Blog. Here's a pretty descriptive video to get you in the mood:

     
    Northern Dancer likes this.
  20. killeroy154

    killeroy154 Survivalist

    We like bike riding on the Virginia Creeper Trail. It used to be a rail road that shut down. We drive to the town of Damascus Virginia and a shuttle company takes us and our bikes to the beginning on top of Whitetop Mtn. uploadfromtaptalk1458595358619.png We make pretty much a day of it. We ride the 17 miles (27 km) back to Damascus. A person can continue on down to Abington another 16 miles and have a shuttle pick you up to return you to your vehicle. 0d93a81f8b4e71e590477cc35478f596.jpg 07794d92fae95266fd56e938256a7249.jpg d8998f8a73892a94a2def9694afe6acb.jpg

    It isn't all that strenuous, but it is fun and relaxing. I like to imagine the train coming around some cliffs that are realy close, and how it must have been realy puffing the smoke and steam out as it climbed the mountain.
     
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