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Wool Clothing for winter camping

Discussion in 'Attire' started by AurelioLeo, Apr 12, 2013.

  1. AurelioLeo

    AurelioLeo Newbie

    There is nothing like good old fashion wool to keep you warm during winter camping trips. Wool has several qualities that distinguish it from hair or fur: it's crimped, it's elastic, and it grows in clusters. Wool fibers repel water in which going winter camping that makes it a great asset. What's your input on wool for winter camping attire?
     
  2. campforums

    campforums Founder Staff Member

    Wool is great because it is very warm but I also find it is very uncomfortable when it gets wet and itchy on the skin. So either wear a thin cotton layer underneath or consider some synthetic fabrics which as an alternative to wool.
     
  3. Esperahol

    Esperahol Newbie

    I happen to be fantastically allergic to wool, which is sad because it's soft. Ah, well. Also it just doesn't seem like it'll hold up well without some level of synthetic aid. Then again I'm a climber and I don't put a high primium on not taking exciting risks.
     
  4. 2sweed

    2sweed Natural Camper Staff Member

    I too am allergic to wool. If I try wearing it as a sweater or wool pants, I get itchy. However, one way is wearing a longsleeved teeshirt or flannel shirt underneath to protect your skin from direct contact with the wool. And wearing cotton or silk longjohn's underneath wool pants. I usually wear down-filled coats and dress in layers of clothing that are easy to peel off as needed, or add back on as weather patterns change. While wool keeps you toasty warm, it is easy to get over-heated or too hot when wearing them on the trail. So I often leave the wool clothes behind and just keep a small wool blanket to use for warmth over my sleeping bag or for around the camp fire at night.
     
  5. campforums

    campforums Founder Staff Member

    Ah, clothing material allergies suck. I am allergic to brass or nickel I think because I have a few belts which when I wear for a few days in a row I get a itchy red rash on my abdomen where the belt buckle makes contact with the skin.

    As for dressing warm have you tried some of the synthetic clothes like the nylon and spandex warm wear clothes like Under Armor or North face?
     
  6. Anons123

    Anons123 Newbie

    I have a huge wool jacket it's red and it's huge my friend left it here
     
  7. campforums

    campforums Founder Staff Member

    Hopefully your friend doesn't want it back! Haha :D
     
  8. Jezebella

    Jezebella Newbie

    I lived with an Alaskan survival instructor and he told me this about clothing for cold weather. You should always wear fom the inside out, wicking, warming and weather. That means you wear wicking long underwear as your first layer, wool pants and a thick wool sweater as your second layer, and waterproof pants, and a waterproof parka as your third layer.
     
  9. campforums

    campforums Founder Staff Member

    That makes sense for comfort as well since wool is a very rough fabric and kinda itchy against the skin. It is quite warm though.
     
  10. bigteeth96

    bigteeth96 Newbie

    Ah, wool is very warm. I also like the thermal clothing by underarmor. They keep me very warm. On top of that can be a nice, big, down, puffy winter coat. Those are the best.
     
  11. Faust

    Faust Explorer

    Those that can't take the wool, try Merino wool (the softest wool made), expensive but well worth the extra cost. Try the socks and/or underwear first, if you get great results then you can justify buying very expensive Merino wool shirts, pants, coats etc.

    If you need to stay super warm, Alpaca fleece is bar none the best in my experience, It's lighter, softer and warmer than standard wool. Though the very best is also the most expensive.
     
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